ALA Proposal: New Chapter 3 elements for Optical Disc Data Storage Format and Optical Disc Recording Method

6JSC/ALA/44
1 August 2015

New Chapter 3 elements for Optical Disc Data Storage Format and Optical Disc Recording Method

Related documents: 6JSC/ALA/16 and the constituency responses to that proposal.

Abstract: Create two new instructions to enable recording specific optical disc characteristics: RDA 3.21, Optical Disc Data Storage Format and RDA 3.9.4, Production Method for Optical Disc. Add
terms to RDA Glossary to support the new instructions.

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One Response to ALA Proposal: New Chapter 3 elements for Optical Disc Data Storage Format and Optical Disc Recording Method

  1. kelleym says:

    ACOC: XBOX AND PLAYSTATION DISCS SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN OPTICAL DISC DATA STORAGE FORMAT.
    Xbox and Playstation use standard physical disc formats: CD, DVD, Blu-ray. The difference between an Xbox game disc on Blu-ray and a Blu-ray Disc with video on it is like the difference between a DVD-ROM for a Mac and one for Windows. This also explains why you can play DVD or Blu-ray videos on an Xbox or Playstation device. If you put an Xbox disc in a PC, it will understand the file structure; it just won’t be able to do anything with it. A PC won’t understand what a Wii U disc is at all. The companies that make these game consoles have to pay to use the DVD or Blu-ray format. Nintendo didn’t want to pay so they created their own format. This gap suggests that RDA needs an element for gaming platform and probably also operating systems.

    CCC: PROPOSED TERMS ARE MORE DETAILED THAT THOSE USED BY PREMIS OR PBCORE:
    It’s not that we need more detail, we just need different details. Preservation focuses on file formats because they’re all about preserving files and data. If a preservationist has an optical disc with data, they’re probably more interested in getting the data onto a more stable carrier than in describing the disc. OLAC, on the other hand, deals with conveying information about (mostly commercially mass-produced) discs to the general public. What we are interested in is information to help with the FRBR select task by answering the question, “Do I have the right technology to use this thing?”

    The PBCore list is closer to what we need, but is designed for the narrower purpose of describing video and to some extent audio. It does not split out type of disc and recording method, which we think is a useful thing to do because it allows catalogers to apply less specific categories. The PBCore is also missing some terms. It lists only BD-Videodisc. BD-Videodisc is not physically distinct from other types of Blu-Ray Discs. The PBCore list does not include BD-R, etc. They list CD-ROM, but not DVD-ROM. DVD-ROM might be confusing to some catalogers since the majority of mass-produced DVD videos are released on DVD-ROM.
    The end-user is not likely to be interested in the burned versus stamped distinction, but it is useful for public services staff when troubleshooting complaints that a given disc doesn’t work. I know our public services staff appreciate having that information. Preservation labs, unlike certain professors, are probably not trying to play discs on ancient DVD players. This distinction is only relevant to preservation in the sense that burned discs have a slightly lower expected lifespan than stamped discs. Neither type is a good preservation format.

    CCC: OPTICAL DISC DATA STORAGE FORMAT SHOULD BE LISTED IN 3.19 WITH ENCODING FORMAT.
    The naming of these categories is problematic because there aren’t good terms in common use. Although we changed the name to data storage format at some point, we are still trying to point at a hardware-level distinction. We mean the physical form on which the data is stored. This might have been less confusing if we had stuck with our previous name “optical disc physical standard” (http://sandbox.metadataregistry.org/vocabulary/show/id/396.html)

    CCC: CHANGE RECORDING METHOD LIST TO STAMPED + CD-R, DVD-R, ETC.
    The CCC’s version would work in most but not all situations. The disc surface of most burned discs states what type of disc they are. However, not all do, which is why we included the broader burned category. Greta de Groat at Stanford reports that she catalogs many burned discs from African NGOs that are not labeled by type. She has been able to identify some of them by googling the serial number and there is software that will give you this information if you put the disc in a drive. However, it does not seem appropriate for RDA to force catalogers to do this. The only way this approach would work is if there were an option for something like burned (unspecified type).

    CCC: CHANGE DEFINITION FROM “RECORD ONCE” TO “WRITEABLE ONCE”
    Agree

    LC: PLACEMENT OF OPTICAL DISC STORAGE FORMAT AT 3.21
    Agree

    LC: DISTINCTION BETWEEN ENCODING FORMAT AND OPTICAL DISC STORAGE FORMAT
    Encoding format answers the question, What kind of software do I need to use the data on this disc?
    Optical disc data storage type answers the question, What kind of hardware do I need to read this disc?

    Recording method answers the question, Is this a burned disc that might not be working because it’s incompatible with my hardware or is just a defective disc? This information might also be useful for assessment about the potential longevity of a resource.

    This chart of concrete situations may be helpful.
    Encoding format Optical disc data storage type Recording method
    Audio CD CD audio CD Stamped
    MP3 CD on CD-R MP3 CD Burned (CD-R)
    VCD VCD CD Stamped
    DVD video on DVD-R DVD video DVD Burned (DVD-R)
    DVD video of Shakespeare play and Word file with text of play DVD video
    Word DVD Stamped
    DVD audio DVD-A DVD Stamped
    QuickTime video on DVD+R QuickTime DVD Burned (DVD+R)
    PowerPoint presentation on DVD-RAM [PowerPoint?] DVD Burned (DVD-RAM)
    Excel files on burned DVD with no external identification Excel DVD Burned
    Multimedia learning software for children on DVD-ROM [presumably an executable file of some kind that probably doesn’t need an encoding format] DVD Stamped
    Xbox game on DVD-ROM [currently missing values here] DVD Stamped
    Wii U game disc [currently missing values here] Wii U Stamped
    Blu-ray Disc of feature film for Blu-ray player Blu-ray [video] Blu-ray Disc Stamped
    MPEG-4 videos on BD-R MPEG-4 Blu-ray Disc Burned (BD-R)
    Blu-ray Audio Blu-ray Audio Blu-ray Disc Stamped
    PDF files on BD-RE PDF Blu-ray Disc Burned (BD-RE)
    [sorry I don’t think this is coming through well in the comment]

    LC: WHY IS DISC IN BLU-RAY DISC CAPITALIZED?
    It’s a trademarked name.

    LC: IS THERE A NEED FOR “DETAILS OF OPTICAL DISC STORAGE FORMAT?”
    We are not able to think of any situations at this point in time, but it might be useful to include the option.

    LC: IS IT NECESSARY TO HAVE DISC AS PART OF THE VOCABULARY TERMS “BURNED DISC” AND “STAMPED DISC?”
    Since disc is currently implied by the element name, it is probably not necessary.

    LC: SIMPLIFYING TYPES OF BURNED DISCS
    There probably are only two categories of burned discs. Probably we should standardize our definitions since record and write in this context mean the same thing.

    Recordable only once (e.g., BD-R, DVD-R)
    Recordable multiple times (e.g., BD-RE, DVD+RW)

    The use cases we can think of have to do with the distinction between stamped and burned. However, if a disc is re-writable, this is important to know. Re-writable discs are rare in a library context, but may occur in archival collections. It is hard to think of a typical library use case where knowing whether something is a DVD-R or DVD+R is helpful. However, the actual format names are what is written on the disc and what the public and catalogers are likely to recognize. If the category names are simplified, they would actually be much harder to apply in practice because many catalogers would have to look up which category a given disc falls into. The specific formats are also more meaningful to the public.
    The difference between burned and stamped discs can be identified visually by looking at the underside of the disc. The only exception we know of is that there are apparently some pirated discs that are burned are manufactured so that they look like stamped discs.

    LC: ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ON VOCABULARY
    If the proposal is approved, these can be cleaned up.

    UK: OBJECTION TO A NEW ELEMENT FOR OPTICAL DISC STORAGE FORMAT BECAUSE IT IS A TYPE OF ENCODING FORMAT
    See response to LC above

    UK: PUTTING BURNING AND STAMPING IN THE MAIN LIST OF PRODUCTION METHODS AT 3.9.1.3
    There is such a thing as generalizing too much. Why would any cataloger think to look for this information here and how would they recognize what it’s meant to apply to if they did?

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